Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Kenshin as Christ, the Theology of Kokoro Connect, and Itadakimuasu!

Some weeks, there are no stories that focus on religion and anime, and virtually none that even mention the topic.  Then, some weeks are like this, where a number...

Some weeks, there are no stories that focus on religion and anime, and virtually none that even mention the topic.  Then, some weeks are like this, where a number of quality posts about anime and spirituality are written!

Draggle goes theological, using Christian terminology to explain a different meaning behind death in episode 5 of Kokoro Connect, as well as Heartseed’s role in the series [Draggle’s Anime Blog]:

I’d like to think of Heartseed as the tiller who is growing the kingdom of God, that is caring for the tiny seed that is taking root in Iori and friends’ hearts.

Otakuandrain finds that Keiichi’s response in chapter 287 of Oh! My Goddess! to the manimpulation he’s undergone is quite similar to that of Job. [The Cajun Samurai]

Medievalotaku compares Himura Kenshin to Jesus Christ, bringing up a number of points many viewers might miss at first glance [Medieval Otaku]:

Essentially, this is Eucharistic imagery!  Shishio, like evil, consumes those who fall prey to him; on the other hand, Kenshin is being described as food for the weak, and Christ feeds us weaklings with His body and blood each mass so that we remain in Him so “that My joy may be in you and your joy may be complete” (John 15:11).  If not for Christ offering Himself as food for us, we should all fall to sin.

Lady Saika talks shinigami, examining the types of reapers presented in Bleach, Black Butler, and Death Note. [Lady Geek Girl and Friends]

Charles Dunbar explain how  Dusk Maiden of Amnesia gives insights into how the Japanese view ghosts [Study of Anime]:

The idea of the vengeful spirit, overcome by its anger and swallowed by tremendous regret, is a powerful storytelling tool, often used to terrifying effect. But to humanize it, and give the viewer a stake in the outcome of Yuuko’s tragedy, places Dusk Maiden on a different path than a “typical” ghost story.

Sweetpea reviews “Re:Set,” a visual novel featuring demons representing the seven deadly sins. [Paper Chimes]

John explains what “itadakimasu” means and how its used, and provides information about its Buddhist origins. [Tofugu]

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