First Impressions: Girls’ Last Tour (Shoujo Shuumatsu Ryokou)

Two girls explore a post-war wasteland in this unique slice-of-life show.
girls last tour shoujo shuumatsu ryokou

It’s the end of the world as we know it, and Chito and Yuuri feel fine. Sure, they have to constantly scavenge for food and other necessities, but no one else is around to bother them, so they can explore the world in relative safety. As they make their way through a world destroyed by war, they find little joys in everything from nighttime stars to shooting guns to eating whatever food they find (Yuuri in particular loves her food). As they contemplate the nature of the world before the apocalypse, they live day by day with each other’s companionship as the one constant in their lives.

girls last tour shoujo shuumatsu ryokou

It’s a good thing they ended up here rather than in Made in Abyss.

There’s a unique type of slice-of-life story that eschews the usually pleasant settings of school or attractive fantastical settings for a post-apocalyptic world. Girls’ Last Tour (Japanese title: Shoujo Shuumatsu Ryokou) definitely fits as this type of show. It definitely fits as an iyashikei show with its relaxing atmosphere, even if said atmosphere carries more weight than usual due to its post-war setting. Both Chito and Yuuri are plenty cute and play off each other well, though it does lead to some unnerving moments like Yuuri pointing a rifle at Chito for the last ration bar, following a discussion on how wars are fought over limited resources. There’s definitely an introspective element to this show, present in this first episode through musings on the causes of war. Overall this show is a slice-of-life with a significant change in focus and tone but still maintaining much of the genre’s charm. Fans of post-apocalyptic shows will likely enjoy this one too, as long as they are okay with a show that is more about living than surviving.

— stardf29


Girls’ Last Tour is streaming on Amazon’s Anime Strike.

Frank is known as "stardf29" on various parts of the Internet; it stands for "Star Defender 29", which is something he came up with during his chuunibyou years. Now, when he's not doing things for the Navy or indefinitely delaying his writing projects, he likes engaging in anime, especially of the slice-of-life sort.
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